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Is it true that sweating aids weight loss?

February 16, 2022 2 min read

Is it true that sweating aids weight loss?


When it comes to sweating during exercising, there are a couple of myths and misconceptions:


Truth #1: "If I work out and sweat a lot, I will lose weight."

 

FACT: Well, I suppose that this is partially correct. However, the weight you lose will be water weight rather than fat weight, and it will be replaced when you replenish the necessary fluids during hydration!


Myth #2: "If I sweat excessively, it indicates that I am physically unfit."

 

Fact: Sweating is a method of thermoregulation (i.e., regulating your body temperature), and some people are more efficient at dissipating body heat than others. However, this is NOT a reliable indicator of physical fitness levels. To cool yourself down after exercising, your body generates heat (when muscles contract, the fibres slide over one another, causing friction), and you have four options for releasing this heat. Radiation, convection, conduction, and evaporation are all types of heat transfer. Obviously, sweating falls under the category of evaporation, but if it is running down your neck and armpits, it isn't helping you to cool down at all. Adding some convection (air movement) through a fan will aid in this process because when airflow is added to a wet body, it cools much more quickly than when airflow is added to a dry body.



Ignorance of Myth #3: If you aren't sweating when exercising, you aren't exerting yourself sufficiently.

 

This is likewise false, according to the facts. The reason for this is the same as in myth 2. During strenuous exercise in a hot environment, your body can lose as much as 1.5 litres of water per day, and as much as that per hour during the exercise.Try to drink approximately 8 cups or 2 litres each day (more if you exercise) in order to stay hydrated. In addition, when consuming foods that contain water, such as fruits and vegetables, fluid intake can occur, contributing to your daily fluid requirements.

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Chris Gonzalez

With over more than 10 years in the health and fitness industry, Chris brings his expertise from supporting a broad range of clients achieve goals using a personalised empathic and enthusiastic approach to health and fitness which has become the foundation of his success.

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